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Economic development program description

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Media contact: Eileen Sigler, 541.780.5137

 

Overview, Mission, Bylaws

St. Vincent de Paul is...


Lane County’s largest nonprofit human services organization. Founded in 1953 and incorporated in 1955, the Agency helps more than 84,000 individuals and families each year with emergency and homeless services, and affordable housing. St. Vincent de Paul is committed to providing comprehensive programs to alleviate poverty and help all individuals find a path out of poverty and into self-sufficiency.

Download our Fall 2018 newsletter

Our Mission is...

 

"We assist the poor and those in need of consolation, seeking out and utilizing every resource. Being mindful of the sanctity and dignity of all, we know that any charitable work that advances those goals is within the mission of St. Vincent de Paul."

Our Bylaws... Click to download.

St. Vincent de Paul accomplishes its mission in six core areas...


  • Affordable Housing: approximately 1,400 units of housing have been developed since 1988.
  • Emergency Services: In 2017 provided $340,000 in store vouchers, $34,000 toward rent, $12,000 for utility assistance, $6,000 for propane, and $18,000 for prescription meds. Atkinson Food Room provided 1,600 food boxes per month plus 3,500 holiday boxes and 3,000 backpacks with supplies for kids in need. First Place Family Center in 2017 provided essential day services to 2,100 adults and children under 18 who were homeless or at-risk for homelessness.
  • Homeless Services: Including the Eugene Service Station, which in 2017 served 7,500 (duplicated adults) with restrooms, showers, laundry, and meals,
  • Overnight shelter: In 2017 provided Overnight Parking for 160 people, tent shelter for 95 per night Nov.-March, and overnight shelter/parking for 210, plus day services for 2,100 parents and children under 18 who are homeless/at-risk for homelessness.
  • Recycling Programs: diverted in 2017 30,488,270 pounds of reusable materials and 353,000 mattresses from landfills.
  • Retail Thrift Stores: 15 retail stores with donation centers and a car lot generate revenue for charitable programs. 
  • Self-Sufficiency Services: helps about 1,100 people with job training and placement each year.